Rolling around on the ground can be an effective way to get moving and gauge your core's stability 

Rolling patterns are all about the spine being mobile where it needs to be, and stable where it needs to be 

Being able to segmentally rotate from the cervical spine down through the lumbar spine and back up is important in every rotary sport 

As an assessment tool, they can expose inefficiencies in sequencing which can affect gross movement patterns 

The rolling patterns are both assessment tools as well as warmup exercises. As a warmup exercise, they get the body moving more efficiently 

It helps more intense forms of full-body rotary movement, such swinging a club or bat, throwing a ball or whipping that perfect bounce pass 

Upper Body Supine-to-Prone Tests the core’s ability to be simultaneously dynamic and stable while you rotate your body from back to stomach

Lower Body Supine-to-Prone Tests the core’s ability to be simultaneously dynamic and stable while you rotate your body from your back to your stomach